Luminosity measurement of the LHC accelerator in CERN using ALFA detector

On  March 30, 2011 at 13:06 CET, the first high-energy collision between proton beams was realized on a new Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN near Geneva. This event began the very expected research programme in particle physics, the aim of which is to allow the people to explore the secrets of nature being still hidden to us.

(a) Roman pot scheme, (b) set of scintillation fibres, (c) electronics overview.

(a) Roman pot scheme, (b) set of scintillation fibres, (c) electronics overview.

 

Our workplace works on modeling separate detectors in a unified ATHENA software environment, in which the whole ATLAS project operates, and construction of evaluative algorithms for the data processing. In the case of modeling, we work on introducing the ALFA detector geometries to the measuring system including their material properties and real metrology. This modeling is necessary not only for understanding the physical processes occurring in the forward field of the ATLAS detector but also for accurate track reconstruction of the proton beam during luminosity measurements. Moreover, we also work on several evaluative algorithm types for reconstruction and analysis of proton tracks, which are being used for determination of detector resolutions and luminosity.

(a) Example of visualization, (b)-(c) examples of proton beam reconstruction during testing.

(a) Example of visualization, (b)-(c) examples of proton beam reconstruction during testing.

 

 

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